Small apartment in Stockholm | Will this break ever end?

Still six days to go until two of my three offspring go back to school. Husband disappears on a work trip despite me clinging to his leg pleading ‘please don’t leave me’. We have done Easter crafts, we went to the fantastic Royal Albert Memorial Museum in Exeter and Child 2 finally got to go and have a sleepover with the sharks at the National Marine Aquarium in Plymouth. Today I caved in to pressure and even took them to Woodlands, marketed as a ‘family theme park’, but actually it’s the 7th circle of hell. So we have exhausted all options for rainy day fun, I have nothing left in my arsenal. Come on sunshine and beach picnics, don’t let me down!

I am eyeing this small but perfectly formed Stockholm apartment for sale via Fantastic Frank with unbridled envy. It’s a one bedroom in Vasastan, 68 square metres and 3.2m ceilings, in a stunning turn of century building. Personally, I would buy this apartment on the back of that bedroom photo alone. A beautiful room for long Sunday morning lie-ins reading the newspapers and drinking coffee (ha ha! as if!). Ten points for spotting my favourite Artek stool.

ImageImageImageImageImageImage

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Helsinki apartment | Egg rolling in Devon

We celebrated Easter today by participating in a typically Devonshire sensible passtime: egg rolling.  You chuck boiled eggs down the hill and chase them with a stick, trying to control your competitive urges so that one of the small children can win. This was followed eating two legs of lamb with token vegetables (not just me, we were a crowd, just so you know). I love meat. Can’t get enough of the stuff. Apologies to vegetarians.

Here’s a beautiful apartment from my native Finland. It’s in Helsinki, and besides from being in Helsinki it scores on all levels of perfection: it’s white, it has wood and it has taxidermy.

via Bolig

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

Tagged , , , , , ,

Family home in Copenhagen, Easter holidays Scrabble standoff

A superb start to the Easter school holidays, we had friends staying for two nights, very special people – we go back years and years, we don’t meet up as often as we would like but when we do it’s like we have never been apart. One of the reasons why we fell in love with our house when we first saw it was that we can double the numbers and still live comfortably.  Me and husband both have family and friends living far and away and when everyone has multiplied with several kids and dogs, we wanted a house that can store that extra volume, extra chaos, and have a bit of spare capacity for the inevitable game of midnight musical beds (small children ending up in parents’ beds, parents ending up anywhere between living room sofas and dog beds). We hiked en famille to the top of the steep hill overlooking Bigbury Bay, we cooked, we drank wine, we fell asleep on the sofas in front of the fire an hour after the kids had gone to bed, which is about the same time we used to leave the house to go out to bars and clubs back in the day. We sent our friends off on their drive home and finished the Saturday with a Scrabble tournament, and I wiped the floor with my opponents – husband and my 6-year old son. There was a bit of a disagreement regarding whether American English spelling was accepted, but I stood my ground, to ferocious accusations of cheating. I was crowned champion (deservedly). Life is good.

I saw this home featured in Bo Bedre, a house in Copenhagen designed for a family of four,  and thought that this would be great for gatherings. Space for children to run around, space to sit down with a cup of tea and a book safe in the knowledge that you can be together and be on your own at the same time. I love the black kitchen, let’s move away from the all-white interiors, my Nordic brothers and sisters.

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Mountain cabin in Reineskarvet, Norway

Pretty spring colours are everywhere, so fresh and bright, or alternatively delicately pale pastels, Easter decorations, flowers, summer fashion, blah blah blah. When the rest of Europe is packing away their merino thermals, up north Easter is when the ski season actually gets going.

This cabin is in a fantastic location in Norway near Ål, in Reineskarvet, only a short hop from the ski resorts Hemsedal and Geilo, and another short hop from Finse. The entire plateau is a true Disneyland for cold weather adventurists, and it has played a big part in  many polar expeditions; Scott’s ill-fated South Pole expedition trained in Finse, and many present day adventures have started here (our Greenland trip included). Hardangervidda’s fierce weather provides ideal training conditions for such adventures, with blizzards, extreme cold and high winds a normal occurrence during the winter months.

What better place to build a cabin, I say. The mountain hut is located at 1100 metres with huge panoramic windows giving these incredible views of the mountains and surrounding wilderness. Outside and Inside it is clad with aspen, lovely light pale wood that is soft to touch and has great acoustic properties. A neat 124 square metres houses five bedrooms, a bathroom, a sauna and a huge open plan living space. I’d happily have winter all year long if I could live here.

via Hytteliv, photos by Sveinung Bråthen

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

School design in Scandinavia

While we are on the subject of education

This is a nursery school in Fagerborg, near Oslo, design Reiulf Ramstad Architects

ImageImageImageImage

and this is the Tellus nursery school in Stockholm, designed by Tham & Videgard (same guys who did this bad boy)

ImageImageImage

and one in Finland, Ajurinmäki nursery by AFKS

ImageImage

aaaand meanwhile, here in the UK…

Tagged , ,

Rebel (Walls)

I spent yesterday in London at the EABG conference and got home to Devon very very late but totally fired up, such an inspirational, amazing day, I was honoured to be in the same room, let alone meet, with so many people who really are the change they want to see. I could not get enough about evidence-based education and got many ideas on how to implement it on a micro level at home in Sami’s programme, but to think that over in the US that is what is driving policy, instead of the collective incompetence of a handful of half-wits (UK) – it’s just breathtaking. As is this wallpaper, from the Swedish company Rebel Walls.

ImageImage

thank you LoveNordic for the pictures!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

(un)conscious shopping

I woke up from deep sleep around 3.30am to find that husband in bed had been replaced with a small child and half a dozen toy sharks. I must have – for some inexplicable reason – decided to have a browse on the Finnish auction site Huuto.net, and in my half-sleep I guess I bid for yet another Artek E60 stool and went back to sleep. I won it, it’s in Finland. Nice bright yellow though! A bit of spring vibe in the middle of our flood warnings. Lesson: do not keep iPads under your bed.

Image

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Winter blues

Originally posted on Photo avant-garde:

Winter blues, Mikko-Largestedt-07

By photographer Mikko Lagerstedt.

View original

Concrete House in Lagnö, Sweden

Happy Friday! I could not sleep last night for all the BIG PLANS. Here’s today’s house porn, I shall wait while you pick your jaw off the floor…

This concrete wonder is in Lagnö in the Stockholm archipelago, and it is the handiwork of Tham & Videgård Arkitekter who are famous for reinterpreting traditional structures in a way that makes you go slightly weak at the knees. From the road, you see a concrete wall. On the other side facing the sea, a swimming pool and a sprawling partly glass covered veranda, massive floor to ceiling teak windows and a view to the sea. With a rather modest 100 square metres it manages to look discreet and not like a cold war mausoleum. Inside, it’s Artek-tastic. I love it. Can someone get a message to the owners that I would like to be their friend and come and live here? Please?

Featured in Residence magazine, styled by Lotta Agaton.

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Olafur Eliasson @ ARoS

I was woken up at 5am this morning by our eldest, he does not sleep much and when he is up, the day starts right there. We decided to remove him from a school that had failed him and now he is home educated while we figure out where to go and what to do, so we are literally living in each others pockets. In the small hours before everyone else wakes up, there is plenty of time to ponder and worry.

Then an email lands into my inbox which may change everything. After the rainiest year since records began here in Devon, suddenly there it is, a rainbow.

Olafur Eliasson is one of my favourite artists, he creates spectacular large scale installations which you experience by being inside them. He has built a circular 150 metre long walkway above the rooftop of ARoS, the museum of modern art in Aarhus. You can walk along the panoramic three metre wide walkway and see the entire city and bay through the colours of the rainbow.

Eliasson describes his project:

”Your rainbow panorama enters into a dialogue with the existing architecture and reinforces what is already given, namely views of the city. I have created a space which virtually erases the boundaries between inside and outside – where people are a little unsure as to whether you have stepped into a work or into part of the museum. This uncertainty is important to me because it encourages people to think and sense beyond the dimensions, they are used to commit themselves in.”

Life is weird sometimes. And Rainbow School would be a good name for a brand new school.

ImageImageImageImage

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 37 other followers